Friday 14 February 2014

Author(s): Madhu Ramnath

How central Indian tribes are coping with climate change impacts

How central Indian tribes are coping with climate change impacts

Faced with crop losses because of erratic rainfall and extreme weather, tribal farmers of Maharashtra and Madhya Pradesh turn to bewar and penda forms of cultivation that keeps them nourished all times of the year, but government agencies are bent on rooting out these farm practices

Flower of wellness

Flower of wellness

Medicinal properties of endangered dhawai phool are recognised in Ayurveda and modern medicine

Jack of all traits

Jack of all traits

Monkey jack, a lesser-known cousin of jackfruit, finds use in kitchen, cosmetics and medicine

A touch of powder

A touch of powder

Maharashtrians spice up their simple meals with dry oilseed chutney

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  • Food sourced from the wild

    Food sourced from the wild are not just important for the food and nutritional needs of the people but it also plays a major role in the cultural ethos of communities. You have rightly highlighted where there are problems/threats but one thing is clear- in many instances the youth are not keen to be seen consuming food collected from the wild- there are many reasons including all those you have pointed out, but when none (the majority/mainstream??) of us value such food or the traditional knowledge, why would the young want to do? Landuse changes, restrictions, monocropping etc., will definitely affect the wild food but once such knowledge is lost from a community's memory,we would be losing something precious including the chatpata receipe you have given!

    Posted by: Anonymous | 2 years ago | Reply
  • Good article. We would like

    Good article. We would like to focus on the issues related to indigenous Food habits and procurement/collection/harvesting/conserving practices of communities living in Eastern Ghats. This article gave us an understating about process of approach.

    Posted by: Anonymous | 2 years ago | Reply
  • A brilliant article on forest

    A brilliant article on forest dependence and differential food habits. Such stories are important in documenting the diet diversity and social dynamics of food and forestry. A commendable piece by Madhu Ramnath.

    Posted by: Anonymous | 2 years ago | Reply
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