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  • Excellent article. Vocational

    Excellent article.
    Vocational education (education based on occupation or employment), also known ascareer and technical education (CTE) or technical and vocational education and training (TVET) is education that prepares people for specific trades, crafts and careers at various levels from a trade, a craft, technician, or a professional position in engineering,accountancy, nursing, medicine, architecture, pharmacy, law etc. Craft vocations are usually based on manual or practical activities, traditionally non-academic, related to a specific trade, occupation, or vocation. It is sometimes referred to as technical education as the trainee directly develops expertise in a particular group of techniques.
    Vocational education may be classified as teaching procedural knowledge. This can be contrasted with declarative knowledge, as used in education in a usually broader scientificfield, which might concentrate on theory and abstract conceptual knowledge, characteristic of tertiary education. Vocational education can be at the secondary, post-secondary level,further education level and can interact with the apprenticeship system. Increasingly, vocational education can be recognised in terms of recognition of prior learning and partialacademic credit towards tertiary education (e.g., at a university) as credit; however, it is rarely considered in its own form to fall under the traditional definition of higher education.
    Vocational education is related to the age-old apprenticeship system of learning. Apprenticeships are designed for many levels of work from manual trades to high knowledge work.
    Our school education system offers combinations of courses in the higher secondary level such that a student by choosing these groups can pursue engineering or medicine, even though these two streams call for entirely different aptitudes. The ideal higher secondary system would orient the student towards evaluating their aptitude and choosing to pursue one of the two streams. This would ensure that the chosen stream matches their aptitude. This is not happening now.
    In the absence of proper orientation in the system, parents and their wards follow an inappropriate procedure while selecting their branch of study in the college. During counselling, we notice that the selection of a branch of study is based on the following: (1) The most sought-after branch in counselling, (2) The branch having good job opportunities as seen by the previous year placements, (3) Parental pressure and (4) Peer pressure.
    This is not the right practice. The correct way will be to spend some time assessing oneÔÇÖs interest for a particular branch and check if it matches well with the aptitude one has and the chosen branch of study.
    It is because of such practices that we face problems of employability and dissatisfaction in existing jobs, which can lead to high turnover rates, low productivity and increase in the stress level of employees.
    India produces 50 lakh graduates every year. Experts say with poor English language skills, computer training and analytical ability, making the cut from the classroom to the boardroom is not easy.
    According to Labour BureauÔÇÖs ÔÇ£Third Annual Employment & Unemployment Survey 2012-13ÔÇØ released on (November 29, 13), unemployment rate amongst illiterate youth is lower than educated youth. A comparison with the earlier report by labour bureau shows that the unemployment level has increased during 2012-2013 over 2011-2012.

    While unemployment rate among illiterate youth is lowest with 3.7 per cent for the age group 15-29 years at all India level in 2012-2013, the unemployment rate in the same category was reported at 1.2 per cent in 2011-2012 report.

    Similarly, the unemployment amongst the graduate youth that happened to be at 19.4 per cent in 2011-2012 increased to 32 per cent during 2012-2013.

    As stated in the report, the unemployment rate amongst the educated youths reportedly increased with increase in their education level. (Amongst all age groups viz. 15-24 years, 18-29 years and 15-29 years)

    Economic slowdown pain is quite visible. Hitesh Oberoi, Chief Executive Officer, Managing Director at Naukri.com reckons, ÔÇ£There are anyways less number of jobs because of the economy slowdown and on top of it many educated youth despite having higher degrees donÔÇÖt have required skill set for the job. As a result of this many youths are failing to get jobs.ÔÇØ


    The Labour Bureau survey further shows that every one person out of three persons who is holding a graduation degree and above in the age group 15-29 years is found to be unemployed.

    The need of the hour is practical training at all levels of Higher education.
    Dr.A.Jagadeesh Nellore(AP),India

    Posted by: Anonymous | 2 years ago | Reply
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