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Mining

Letters - June 15, 2012

Issue Date: Jun 15, 2012
Mine Tricks This refers to the cover story on illegal sand mining, “Sand slips” (April 16-30, 2012), in the country. The write-up did not explore how illegal sand mining is affecting agriculture and ecosystems in Karnataka’s capital, Bengaluru.

Hunger games – it’s the real India show

Posted on: 15 May, 2012
The celluloid fantasy of a dystopian world is a reflection of our society

Letters - May 31, 2012

Issue Date: May 31, 2012
Focus Rural The interview, “Tribal philosophy can’t be ignored beyond a point” (April 1-15, 2012), is highly relevant in the context of the ongoing conflict between development and tribal philosophy. Mahatma Gandhi was the first pre- and post-Independence politician and social activist to comprehend the importance of rural way of life. He wanted the state to protect it.

Green nod to Jindal mine nixed

Issue Date: May 15, 2012

Letters - May 15, 2012

Issue Date: May 15, 2012
Freshwater economics

Operation Saranda: from Maoists to Miners

Self-portrait: pillion riding inside Ho territory. In the tribal dialect the word Ho mean human. Photographs by: Sayantan Bera Also read: Between Maoists and mines

Operation Saranda: from Maoists to Miners

According to Indian Bureau of Mines’ 2010 report on mining leases and prospecting licenses, West Singhbhum is the most mined district in Jharkhand, and accounts for almost the entire share of iron ore mined in the state. Already 44 mining leases for iron ore is operational covering an area of 12,374 hectare. As of now most of the mining is concentrated around the periphery of the Saranda forests. The plan is to rip open the seven hundred hills of dense forests where sunlight cannot enter, to 19 new mining leases for the private sector, covering an additional 11,000 ha (approximately). Add to it the concrete roads, CRPF camps and ancillary developments for mining- there is little hope the forests and its perennial streams will survive the assault. Photographs by: Sayantan Bera Also read: Between Maoists and mines

Operation Saranda: from Maoists to Miners

In an around Saranda are doco areas- a local name for illegal raising of iron ore- from river beds, fields and forests. An un-estimated number of crusher units operate in the periphery of Saranda (in Jamda, Manoharpur, Noamundi and littered on the 140 km road running from Barbil in Jharkhand to Rourkella in Orissa) which procures iron ores and sells it to legal mines. ‘4 people can gather as much as 12 tonnes of ore within 3 hours. It is then trucked to a crusher unit; the villagers get about Rs 1000,’ tells Sushil Aind sitting on a pile of iron ore stacked inside Tontogera forest village, neighboring the hills cleared for mining by ArcelorMittal. Photographs by: Sayantan Bera Also read: Between Maoists and mines

Operation Saranda: from Maoists to Miners

Among the Ho’s it is customary to give burials in a corner of the village under the shade of trees. In 1889 when the British uprooted Ho villages in Saraikela by declaring them as reserve forests, the Ho’s argued the Sasandiris (burial stones) are their land titles. Eventually they moved southwards to Saranda forests. Photographs by: Sayantan Bera Also read: Between Maoists and mines
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