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Western Ghats

Coorg cardamom gets GI status

Author(s): Deepa Kozhisseri
Issue Date: May 15, 2009
Producers get a boost coorg green cardamom, grown in southwest Karnataka, has received the geographical area indicator or GI status. This means only cardamom grown in Kodagu--formerly Coorg--can be marketed as Coorg cardamom. The Controller General of Patents, Designs and Trademarks, under the commerce ministry, granted the gi status

Court allows widening of 17 km of road

Author(s): Nidhi Jamwal
Issue Date: Apr 30, 2009

In court

Issue Date: Mar 31, 2009
water feud: Acting on a petition against the Kalasa-Bhandura diversion project, the Karnataka high court has issued show cause notice to the state government and the Union ministry of environment and forests. The project will divert 7,560 million cubic metres of water from river Mandovi to river Malaprabha and displace Kankumbi and Nerse villages, said Paryavarni, a non-profit based in Belgaum district, in the petition. The project will also submerge 732 hectares (ha) of land in the Western Ghats, of which 500 ha is under forest cover.

At home in a cave

Karimbuzha Ravi’s family is nuclear. When a Cholanaicken son marries, he moves out of his parent’s alai and establishes a new home in the vicinity. Girls after marriage follow their husbands into the new alai. Photographs by: Ajeeb Komachi

At home in a cave

The Cholanaickens are wary of strangers. But we were accompanied by Moinkutty, who runs the forest produce collection centre and is familiar to the Cholanaickens’ who exchange fruits, honey and pepper for rice, salt, oil and chilly at the centre. Photographs by: Ajeeb Komachi

At home in a cave

Karikka’s stares unsparingly into the lens as she relaxes for a portrait. All Cholanaicken families keep dogs for hunting and as guards for their rock shelters. Photographs by: Ajeeb Komachi

At home in a cave

A Cholanaicken wanders in search of food and forest produce. It is usually the men who gather minor forest produce such as honey, ginger, wild pepper and soap seeds. Women and children collect tubers, fruits, nuts and seeds. The tribe leads a semi nomadic life in the forests and have limited contact with the outside world. It was in 1970, that the existence of the Cholanaickans in the Nilambur valley was discovered, and till recently they were considered an offshoot of the Kattunaickans, another tribe living in the same valley. Photographs by: Ajeeb Komachi

At home in a cave

Karimbuzha Ravi’s mother now cooks in aluminium vessels bought from the Nilambur market. Earlier she used bamboo pots. Each family may gather and cook food separately, but meals are community affairs. Photographs by: Ajeeb Komachi

At home in a cave

Cholanaickens are experts basket weavers. Although they make for beautiful handicrafts, Poonikottai, baskets made of reeds and cane, are not sold. They are used to store household articles and to carry forest produce. Photographs by: Ajeeb Komachi

At home in a cave

No names yet, Cholanaika children are given names only when seven or eight years old. Infant mortality is high among the Cholanaickens. Medical care is hard to come by, given the remoteness of their quarters. Photographs by: Ajeeb Komachi
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