Letters

 
Published: Friday 10 July 2015

Water, water

This is with reference to Anil Agarwal's article 'Promising water' ( Down To Earth, Vol 8, No 8; September 15). Even though environment is an issue on which the very survival of life on Earth depends, most political parties have failed to incorporate environmental issues in their manifestos. This is because of the common person's low priority to environmental issues. Politicians draft their manifestos only to cater to populist measures. Therefore, they rake up only those issues which directly help in improving their vote percentage and seats.

Protecting the environment is viewed as anti-development by most people in urban India; even the poor are least concerned about the environment, except those who are directly affected -- such as those affected by the Narmada dam.

To put environment on the nation al agenda, there is an immediate need to break the myth that environmental conservation is anti-development. People need to be educated and awakened about the environment before we can expect political parties to take these issues seriously.



PRADEEP KUMAR SHARMA
Sirmour, Himachal Pradesh


The real issues
Anil Agarwal's article on water is a timely one. On a visit to a remote block in Tehri district of Uttar Pradesh, I was surprised to find that the only demand of the local people was drinking water. Every summer a large number of people die due to diarrhoea and other water-borne diseases. The situation is so bad that many villagers have migrated to the Shivaliks of Dehradun in the Terai area only due to the water scarcity in their own region. During my trip to the Uttarakhand hills in Uttar Pradesh, I found that people are increasingly migrating to the plains because some 13,000 villages in this area face an acute water shortage.

But sadly, during this election political parties only raised issues like stability and Kargil during their campaigning. They even attempted to confuse the people claiming that issues like clean water, roads, electricity and sanitation were issues of the state whereas their vote must be for national issues. The present state of affairs of villagers abandoning the mountains goes against the saying that "mountains are water towers"....

Craving for fulfilment

The article 'Happiness of nations' ( Down To Earth , Vol 8, No 10; October 15) should serve as an eye-opener to all those who crave for material possessions, name and fame. People are working so hard and with such a single-minded obsession that they tend to ignore human relationships. By the time they achieve their goals, they are no longer in a position to enjoy what they have earned. It is time for people to realise that there are more things in life that give lasting happiness and peace of mind than chasing wealth. And building human relations is the single important factor which gives great happiness....

Spreading the word

I have been a regular reader of Down To Earth. Your recent articles on the harmful effects of diesel emissions are an eye-opener to the people of this country. I feel that the contents of this magazine should be published in other Indian languages so that more and more people get enlightened....

The real Issues

Anil Agarwal's article on water is a timely one. On a visit to a remote block in Tehri district of Uttar Pradesh, I was surprised to find that the only demand of the local people was drinking water. Every summer a large number of people die due to diarrhoea and other water-borne diseases. The situation is so bad that many villagers have migrated to the Shivaliks of Dehradun in the Terai area only due to the water scarcity in their own region. During my trip to the Uttarakhand hills in Uttar Pradesh, I found that people are increasingly migrating to the plains because some 13,000 villages in this area face an acute water shortage.

But sadly, during this election political parties only raised issues like stability and Kargil during their campaigning. They even attempted to confuse the people claiming that issues like clean water, roads, electricity and sanitation were issues of the state whereas their vote must be for national issues. The present state of affairs of villagers abandoning the mountains goes against the saying that "mountains are water towers"....

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