Wildlife & Biodiversity

Global Eco Watch: Major ecological happenings of the week (August 12 - August 18)

Down To Earth brings you the top happenings in the world of global ecology

 
By DTE Staff
Last Updated: Monday 19 August 2019
M-44 traps, which spray cyanide on animals when activated, are used to kill coyotes and other livestock predators. Photo: Getty Images
M-44 traps, which spray cyanide on animals when activated, are used to kill coyotes and other livestock predators. Photo: Getty Images M-44 traps, which spray cyanide on animals when activated, are used to kill coyotes and other livestock predators. Photo: Getty Images

Trump Administration reverses decision to allow killing of coyotes using traps

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reversed its decision to allow the use of sodium cyanide traps for killing coyotes and other predators in the United States, according to a media report.

The traps, which are called ‘M-44’ traps, look like lawn sprinklers but spray deadly cyanide when triggered by animals attracted by bait.

The decision comes after a boy in Idaho was injured in 2017 when he encountered an M-44.

The traps are used by the US Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services to kill coyotes and other livestock predators.

Five sloth bears rescued in Jharkhand

Five sloth bears were rescued by forest officials from a village in Jharkhand’s Deoghar district, according to a media report.

However, the keepers of the animals managed to escape.

The officials had been informed that five sloth bears, a Schedule II animal under the Wildlife (Protection) Act were being kept in the village by some people. 

A team was formed, which then reached the Mahapur village under Sonaraithadi police station in Deoghar district. It seized the bears. The keepers of the animals however managed to escape before the team arrived.

The recovery of the bears has created another problem since Deoghar does not have a facility to keep such animals. The team has sought direction from the Jharkhand Chief Wildlife Warden in this regard.

All the bears have been found to be tame.

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