How to cure corruption in healthcare

Rx: Only an effective governing body, which includes medical and non-medical members, can stop the culture of kickbacks

 
By Kundan Pandey
Last Updated: Thursday 11 June 2015 | 11:05:10 AM

How to cure corruption in healthcare

imageCorruption in the healthcare sector is old news. Almost everybody in the country has been a victim of some form of graft or malpractice—be it inflated bills, wrong diagnosis, or substandard treatment. So it comes as little surprise when a foreigner who has worked in the Indian medical system says, “kickbacks and bribes oil every part of the Indian healthcare machinery”.

Yet the observations made by Australian district medical officer David Berger, who has written an article in the British Medical Journal on his experience in working with an Indian hospital, has once again sparked a debate—both in the public and political domain—on how to fix the rampant corruption in the healthcare system.

The solutions are obvious, suggests SamiranNundy, a senior doctor with Sir Ganga Ram Hospital in Delhi. “There is a need for collective will and it has to be backed with transparency in the system,” he says. Policy makers have never addressed the issue of corruption in totality, says Nundy. Instead, every time a scam is exposed, the government announces new steps, which seldom get implemented. A good example of the lack of collective will in reforming institutions is the Medical Council of India (MCI), which was embroiled in a scam in 2010. The statutory body was set up to “establish and maintain high standards of medical education and recognition of medical qualifications in India”. But its former president Ketan Desai was arrested for accepting bribe of Rs 2 crore from GyanSagar Medical College in Patiala. As a knee-jerk reaction, the government dissolved the body while announcing in Parliament that it will bring in reforms. But in 2013, the government restored MCI without any reforms. Like in the MCI, corruption cases have surfaced in almost every government health scheme (see ‘Graft files’).

Ashutosh Mishra, executive director of the India chapter of Transparency International, thinks corruption in healthcare is thriving because of lack of transparency. In a survey conducted in 2006, Transparency International found that every year people from the below poverty line category in India shell out over Rs 10,000 crore as bribe for basic needs, including healthcare. The amount that is being wasted because of corruption is close to a third of what the government plans to spend in the sector (Rs 33,725 crore) in 2014-15. “At any standard, there has been no improvement since then,” he adds.

Abhijit More, an activist with non-profit SATHI that works on rural health in Maharashtra and Madhya Pradesh, echoes Mishra’s sentiment. He says the government should make it mandatory for doctors to write down detailed prescriptions with the diagnosis and the medicines prescribed. “Most corrupt doctors just write the medicines which makes it difficult to know what disease the patient is suffering from.”

Talking about lack of transparency, T Sunderaraman, joint convener of public health advocacy group Jan SwasthyaAbhiyan (JSA), says government health insurance scheme RashtriyaSwasthyaBimaYojna is a major source of corruption and needs redesigning. “Under the scheme, the beneficiaries should always be alerted about how much they are paying for treatment. For instance, smart cards of the Delhi Metro tell users how much money has been deducted. The beneficiaries can then question if they are overcharged,” he says.

Monitoring medical colleges

The process of individual corruption begins early, right at the start in medical colleges, with capitation fees for entry to the MBBS course in many private substandard medical colleges, writes Nundy in an editorial in Current Medicine Research and Practice. The same observation is echoed by JasodharaDasgupta, coordinator of Sahyog, a non-profit working on women empowerment and health issues. These experts believe corruption in medical education is the reason behind the worsening situation in healthcare.

India is the only country where sale of medical seats by private medical colleges is part of official policy. It means the ability to pay counts more than merit. Apart from the huge capitation fee, the process of walk-in type of admissions is also problematic. In such cases, even those who lack interest in the profession get admission. And the patients bear the brunt of these lapses as they get treatment from unskilled doctors. To make matters worse, many such doctors unscrupulously indulge in unethical practices to make quick money.

The government, along with MCI, did try to ensure a minimum level of competence by mooting a National Eligibility-cum-Entrance Test as qualifying requirement for all students. But the idea was opposed by medical colleges and they got a stay from the Supreme Court in May 2013.

Graft files
 
Despite scams being unearthed in the healthcare system at regular intervals, government is yet to take effective steps to clean the sector
 
2013
Impersonators caught taking the medical examination in Madhya Pradesh on behalf of candidates
2012
Doctors misuse Centre's health insurance and perform unnecessary hysterectomies on poor women in Bihar, Rajasthan
2010
Medical Council of India chief caught accepting bribe. Body dissolved only to be revived in 2013 without any reform
2010
CBI starts inquiry into the National Rural Health Mission scam in Uttar Pradesh. Six of the accused officers found dead under suspicious circumstances
 

Private medical colleges are also mushrooming by the dozen and the government has little regulation in this regard. According to information received from MCI, there are 27 medical universities in India. Of these, 14 are in the private sector. Till June 30, there were 387 medical colleges, including six new AIIMS, in the country. Of these, 205 colleges are run by private players, informs Union health minister Harsh Vardhan, who admits to the problems in the education sector. “We are looking into how to improve medical education in the country and MCI’s reform is under serious consideration,” he told Down To Earth. On the question of making donations for medical seats illegal, he says, “We will see what is possible through law.”

Sunderaraman says that corruption in medical education can be easily controlled by auditing and keeping records. But it will require political will, he adds.

Ban on kickbacks

The other major issue is that the law is silent over the kickback culture, points out More. JSA has written a letter to the health ministry demanding that kickbacks be made illegal and seen as conflict of interest. Sundraraman says the government should include this in the existing Clinical Establishments (Registration and Regulation) Act, 2010 (CEA). The Act is the only effective initiative taken by the government so far to check malpractices. It calls for registration and regulation of all clinical establishments and attempts to ensure provision of minimum standard facilities in all kinds of medical establishments, including public and private ones, and even small clinics.

Sunderaraman says that the situation is so bad that people do not even believe accepting kickbacks is wrong. The new government recently said it is committed to the idea of health for all. The health minister on July 22 told Parliamment that his ministry is drawing up a panel of reputed medical practitioners and consumer law experts to suggest measures for introducing greater transparency in medical practices.

China, which is facing similar issues, has recently taken steps to tackle systemic kickbacks in the healthcare sector. In December 2013, China’s National Health and Family Planning Commission introduced new regulations for hospitals, physicians and medical product manufacturers. The country prohibited doctors from participating in product promotional activities or illegal disclosure of patient data. It also banned accepting kickbacks and commission, and accepting inducements from patients or their families. The guidelines prescribe prohibitive punishment for defaulters.

Body to check private players

The need for an effective central body to govern the sector is more real than ever today because of rapid privatisation in the sector. According to the National Health Profile, 2013, the money paid by patients to private hospitals for treatment accounted for 71.62 per cent of the total fund inflow in the healthcare sector in 2008-09. The share is expected to increase to 81 per cent by 2015. Thus, experts say, effective reforms in the MCI are important to check malpractices in the health sector. One of the major reforms suggested by experts is to include non-medical members in MCI, which is common in Western countries. “In the UK, the General Medical Council is very tough on corrupt doctors. Its members include journalists, social workers and other professionals, unlike MCI whose members are only doctors and they want to protect themselves,” says Nundy. The step, he says, is essential to have an effective redressal system. There should be transparency in the selection to repose people’s faith in the healthcare system, says More.

Experts say it is unfortunate that the country, whose researchers are playing a pivotal role in medical advances globally, is still struggling with corruption, even in basic healthcare systems.

`Many doctors are simply businessmen'
 
SAMIRAN NUNDYSamiran Nundy, chairperson of the department of surgical gastroenterology and organ transplantation at Sir Ganga Ram Hospital and editor-in-chief of the journal Current Medicine Research and Practice (CMRP), has stirred a hornet's nest by writing an editorial in the British Medical Journal and also in CMRP about rampant corruption in the Indian healthcare system. While speaking to Kundan Pandey, he presses on the need for immediate intervention to check corruption in the healthcare system. Excerpts:
 
Why did you raise the issue?

Australian doctor David Berger, who worked in a small hospital in a Himalayan state, wrote that corruption is rife in Indian medical care and nobody seems to want to do anything about it. So I thought we should get together and do something. The first thing I did was to write an editorial for our journal.

Please elaborate on the nature of corruption in healthcare?

I have spent many years in All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Delhi, and I know the poor can not get admission there the normal way. You know how they get admission? They bribe some ward attendant who comes to a resident doctor or faculty member and says, "this is my brother, he has come from the village", and the bribe-giver gets admitted. In the public sector, there is huge political interference. It is also a form of corruption. Politicians keep dictating things like who will be promoted as professor.

What are the root causes of corruption?

It is imbalance of knowledge on the part of doctors as well as patients. The other problem is that patients respect whatever the doctor says and the latter take advantage of that. Governing bodies and medical councils are also not strong enough to prevent corruption.

Has privatisation played any role in fuelling graft?

Yes it has. Arnold Relbon, who was the editor of the New Indian Journal Medicine, said that in the US gradually more and more medicine is being done for profit and this has fuelled corruption. Similarly in India, many doctors are no longer academicians and professionals, they are simply businessmen.

Apart from awareness, what is needed to curb corruption?

Transparency is needed and it can be achieved by using electronic medical records, the type Barack Obama has promoted in the US. All interactions with doctors should be recorded electronically and privacy can be ensured by limiting access. I am part of a system called Raxa doctor, which is a free, open-source electronic medical records system where people can privately store and retrieve their personal medical data. Patients can share the data with doctors.

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  • I congratulate Kundan pandey

    I congratulate Kundan pandey for this eye opening article.

    In addition to above mentioned points, anoother root cause for corruption in health is comparison of earning capability among the Doctors.

    For example, if a Radiologist earn 2 lac per month or a pathologist makes 1.5 lac per month without taking any risk of handling the patients, then how you expect a Surgeon will be satisfied with 80k per month. surgeon is the one who refer these patients to radiologist or pathologist. surgeon is the one who actually play a role of true doctry,by listening to the patient, answering the queries and taking the risk of operation. if any untoward complication occur, then all the blame is on surgeon and not on any others.

    So unless people and Government, realise the importance of a clinician and surgeons, the problem of kickback will exist.

    Inequality and competition is the cause for corruption. Those (clinician and surgeons) who take the risk of treating the patients deserve highest earning than others who are merely involved in diagnosis.

    Posted by: Anonymous | 4 years ago | Reply
  • People for betterment

    People for betterment of
    Foreign Medical Graduates
    President: R K Agrawal,
    231, Lalbaug, Morbi-2
    Gujarat
    Dt.30.06 2014
    To,
    Health minister,
    Govt of India,
    New Delhi
    Sub:- National level exit exam for medical graduates
    R sir,
    In a shameless move to protect incompetence and the degrading standards of medical education in private colleges and to continue its corrupt practices, mci has recommended national exit exam to be optional and not mandatory 'initially'. God knows how long this 'initially' will mean.
    The earlier appointed impartial board of Govt. Appointed Governors rightly sensed the collusion between mci and private medical college mafia. To nail this, it proposed a national exit exam applicable to all who intend to practice medicine in India with clear road map of making it mandatory by 2015.
    But for corrupt practice to continue, the current board having proximity to medical mafia has replaced the clear frame work of time for which it was optional, by a vague word 'initially', in their proposal submitted to health ministry sometimes around march ÔÇô April 2014.
    The mci is always discriminating with foreign graduates by branding them as incompetents, and subjects them to screening test which is always designed to fail these graduates.
    But when it comes to checking the quality of doctors produced under its own corrupt system, it turns its back and finds various excuses to avoid scrutiny of doctors produced under its own system, so that medical mafia can make more money till its hollow claim of competency is exposed.
    Even the bar council of India has made similar exam for advocates to be mandatory but current mci, due to itÔÇÖs proximity to medical mafia is reluctant to do so.
    It seems in the eyes of corrupt mci, life itself is less precious than justice?
    We demand health ministry to APPROVE THE PROPOSAL IN ITS CURRENT FORM IMMEDIATELY so that at least a stage is set for exit exam as soon as possible.
    We also demand that immediately after approving the proposal in current form the health ministry and mci should take further steps to MAKE IT MANDATORY TO THOSE TAKING FRESH ADMISSIONS FROM NEXT YEAR. Even if it is made mandatory today it will be practically effective after 5 year. THIS STEP NEEDS IMMEDIATE ACTION IF HEALTH MINISTERY REALLY WANTS TO CURB CORRUPTION IN MEDICAL EDUCATION, as this alone will curtail more than 70% corruption in medical education. It will also promote competence in private medical colleges & reduce medical negligence.
    Thanking you,

    yours faithfully,

    (Rk agrawal)

    Copy to Respected Prime Minister of India

    Posted by: Anonymous | 4 years ago | Reply
  • Why the Health Minister is

    Why the Health Minister is silent on the corruption started from Government Health Institutions.Government Officer issued supply orders after getting commission.Verification Board verify the Medicines after getting Commission.Accountant released the Payment after getting Commission.Doctors make requisition of those Companies which pay huge commission. The most affected area which is grey is the procurement of Ayurvedic,Unani Medicines.IN the absence of standards , the procurement officer gets the requisition of such Medicines which never undergone any sort of investigations for efficacy and safety.Crores of Rupees were drained out to oblige such Companies Medicines. Central Government Health Scheme Ayurvedic Store invited Tender of such drugs by name after getting demand from local CGHS Doctors.

    Posted by: Anonymous | 4 years ago | Reply
  • People for betterment

    People for betterment of
    Foreign Medical Graduates
    President: R K Agrawal,
    231, Lalbaug, Morbi-2
    Gujarat
    Dt.10.07. 2014
    To,
    The health minister,
    MOHFW,
    GOI,
    ND
    Sub:-Plight of Foreign Medical Graduates
    R/sir,
    REASON FOR STUDENTS OPTING FOR FOREIGN MEDICAL EDUCATION
    Thousands of meritorious youth, who could not afford Crores of Donation & could not get meagrely available Govt. seats, go abroad for economical medical education.
    DISCRIMINATION BEING METED OUT TO THEM BY MCI ON RETURN
    But on return, they are being discriminated in the name of screening test by the MCI, in collusion with NBE. A glance at the pass percentage of screening tests (just 10% to 20% with an average of 15%) will reveal the amount of discrimination being meted out by MCI to these graduates. FOR THE LAST 2 SEASONS IT IS EXPECTED TO BE WORSE, LESS THAN 10%.
    MCIÔÇÖS ARGUMENT
    I do not buy MCIÔÇÖs argument that medical education all over the world is not up to standards as justification for such a low pass percentage. How come they have much better healthcare system than India has ? And if 90% graduates are indeed not worthy, why not ban this worthless education completely?
    ACTUAL REASON
    However, the fact is that such discriminatorily low passing percentage is kept deliberately to incite fear psychosis in the minds of students, so that they do not go abroad & ultimately fall pray to Pvt. Colleges. As the fear increases, demand for private medical seats increases,as the demand increases, the donation amount increases. Part of donation goes to MCI bosses is no more a secrete..
    SITUATION OF PRIVATE MEDICAL COLLEGES
    Scores of Pvt. colleges openly auction their seats in crores, & pass their students from their own Pvt universities by taking crores again. We know how their faculties & facilities are checked by MCI, which exist only on paper. However, the quality of Doctors produced is nowhere checked even on paper. They all are blanketly stamped competent without any scrutiny.
    POINTED QUESTIONS TO MCI
    Has MCI ever checked the standard of these Pvt. Medical College students by subjecting them to such a test?
    Is it not possible that MCI is asking for some alien standards from foreign college graduates, which its own Pvt. College graduates do not possess?
    THE PERMANENT SOLUTION TO THIS PROBLEM
    In MCI vision 2015 document, the impartial Govt appointed BOG of MCI smelt the foul play of private college controlled BOG of MCI & also the competency concerns against private medical college graduates & hence proposed national exit exam being mandatory by 2015. As the private college mafia controlled BOG of MCI is now back in control, they have sent a proposal to health ministry in March ÔÇôApril 2014 for national exit exam, but changed the core of it to be optional for local graduates initially. MCI isnÔÇÖt concerned about competency level of private medical college graduates & wants to continue its loot for some more years. God knows how long this ÔÇÿinitiallyÔÇÖ will mean.
    WE DEMAND THAT THE PROPOSAL OF MCI BE CLEARED IMMEDIATELY IN ITS PRESENT FORM SO THAT A STAGE IS SET FOR NATIONAL EXIT EXAM.
    WE FURTHER DEMAND THAT IMMEDIATELY THEREAFTER IT SHOULD BE MADE MANDATORY FOR ALL THOSE TAKING NEW ADMISSIONS PERTICULARLY IN PRIVATE COLLEGES. Even if it is made mandatory today, it will be effective after 5 years. DOESNÔÇÖT INDIAN CITIZENS HAVE RIGHT TO KNOW IF THESE PRIVATE COLLEGE GRADUATES ARE ATLEAST OF FOREIGN COLLEGE GRADUATES STANDARD?
    WORLD OVERVIEW IN SUPPORT OF PROPOSED SOLUTION
    All the developed countries such as UK, USA, Canada, Austrailia, Newzealand and even the least developed countries like Nepal has uniform licentiate exam.
    BENEFIT OF PROPOSED SOLUTION
    There will be several benefits to mother india & only losers will be corrupt officials & Pvt. Medical College mafia.
    1.There will be no discrimination against anyone as all are subjected to the same test. More & more students will go abroad for economical education thus increasing supply of competent Doctors.
    2.Increased supply of quality Doctors will improve the health parameters of ailing mother India.
    3. All incompetent doctors, will not be able to get in to the system, thus reducing medical negligence.
    4. Only losers will be corrupt officials & private medical mafia making crores by auctioning their seats, & still giving sub standard education.
    6.Healthcare will be free of corruption, money power & vested interests, which will reduce the overall cost of healthcare.
    7. It will promote competence in Pvt. Medical Colleges as they will have no choice but to improve their standards.
    THE PROOF OF VALIDITY OF ABOVE ARGUMENT
    The proof of validity of above argument lies in the fact that the only opposition you will face is from corrupt officials, the Pvt. college mafia & the existing students of such colleges. Opposition from existing students of Pvt. colleges can be overcome by not making these rules applicable to existing students.
    QUICK TEMPORARY SOLUTION
    If all these need legislative changes, in the short run we can atleast reduce the discrimination meted out to Foreign Graduates by not subjecting them to some alien standards which our own Pvt. Colleges graduates do not possess, by SUBJECTING A REPRESENTATIVE SAMPLE OF SUCH PVT COLLEGE GRADUATES TO THIS TEST ON EXPERIMENTAL BASIS TO FIND OUT IF THE STANDARD EXPECTED ARE INDEED THOSE POSSESSED BY PVT. COLLEGE GRADUATES. OPTIONAL INVOLVMENT WILL NOT BE TRULY REPRESENTATIVE SAMPLE AS ONLY MERITORIOUS STUDENTS WILL DARE TO TAKE IT. Since, all these Pvt. college graduates are blanketly stamped competent, they all must easily pass this test. Or, else it will prove that blanket stamping of Pvt. college graduates as competent is indeed money driven & not merit driven & foreign graduates are indeed being subjected to some alien standards, which its own system does not possess.
    BENEFIT OF TEMPORARY SOLUTION
    This will reduce some discrimination in short run, will increase supply of quality doctors & Govt. will come to know the actual standards of Pvt. College Graduates.
    PRECAUTION TO BE TAKEN
    To get the real picture, all this exercise should be undertaken by an independent body free from the influence of MCI as this will also expose how these Pvt. Colleges were recognised by MCI.
    ALTERNATE TEMPORARY SOLUTION OF RURAL POSTING
    Alternatively, THOSE GRADUATES WHO SCORES 40% IN SCREENING TEST MAY BE GIVEN RESTRICTED/ SUPERVISED LICENCE TO PRACTICE IN RURAL AREAS. FOR EACH YEAR OF RURAL SERVICE THEY MAY BE GIVEN 5 BONUS MARKS. WHEN THIS ADD UP TO 50% THEY MAY BE GIVEN FULL LICENCE.
    BENEFIT OF ALTERNATE TEMPORARY SOLUTION
    Rural population is presently dependent on Quacks. These graduates are well trained in modern medicine. Healthcare of many foreign countries is dependent on so trained doctors only. They are deliberately branded incompetent by MCI for illicit financial gains. However, to alienate fear of MCI, it is proposed to give them restricted/ supervised licence.
    Thanking you, Yours sincerely,
    (R K Agrawal)
    Copy to:
    1. Prime Minister of India, sh. Narendra bhai Modi, New Delhi
    2. National Board of Examination, New Delhi
    3. Medical Council of India, New Delhi

    Posted by: Anonymous | 4 years ago | Reply
  • People for

    People for betterment of
    Foreign Medical Graduates
    President: R K Agrawal,
    231, Lalbaug, Morbi-2
    Gujarat
    Dt.30.08.2014
    To,
    Health minister,
    Govt of India,
    New Delhi
    Sub:- Providing level playing field to foreign medical graduates.

    Ref:- 1. PBFMG letter dated 30.06.2014 titled ÔÇ£ Plight of foreign medical graduates & ways to improve supply of competent doctors while eliminating all types of incompetent doctors.
    2. PBFMG letter dated 30.06.2014 titled ÔÇÿ Plight of foreign medical graduatesÔÇÖ
    3. PBFMG letter dated 10.07.2014 titled ÔÇÿ National exit exam for medical graduates.

    R sir,
    We on behalf of PBFMG hearty congratulate you & the committee formed by your good self for having come up with the brilliant proposal of exit exam which ensures uniform standards in medical education by making it mandatory for permanent registration & at the same time not affecting supply by innovative provision of temporary registration.

    We also congratulate you & the committee to incorporate mandatory provisions to appear & pass the test for permanent registration, thereby overturning the malafide intention of MCI, giving option to local graduates to by pass the exam, to avoid scrutiny of doctors produced by medical mafia controlled private colleges under MCIÔÇÖs own corrupt system. Hope, its their last try to avoid scrutiny of doctors produced by these dubious colleges. Let the people know if their competency level before allowing them to play with their life.

    Scores of private medical colleges openly auction their seats in crores & pass them from their own private universities by taking crores again. Concerns regarding standards of education in such colleges are systematically overlooked by MCI, deciding their recognition & derecognition based on the weight of suitcase such colleges carry for likes of ketan desai in MCI.

    Foreign medical graduates, on the other hand, are the committed souls to this profession, having earned their admission in adverse terrains, without paying a single paisa by way of black money & donations to MCI or the medical mafia. Their admissions were till recently directly monitored by MCI by way of eligibility certificate. The process was much cleaner than the way private college mafia takes admission in their colleges by open auction of seats through daily advertisement in local newspapers.
    Still private college mafia in convenience with likes of ketan desai in MCI, having received no black money or donation from foreign students, has long been branding foreign graduates as incompetent by subjecting them to highly discriminatory level of screening test designed purposely to fail students to incite fear psychosis of not to go abroad & rather fall pray to private college seats, filled at huge donations. It is requested to direct MCI to desist itself from branding of foreign graduates as incompetent till relative level of competence is established by uniform application of exit exam to foreign graduates vis-a-viz medical mafia controlled private college graduates.

    MCI in its history since independence didnÔÇÖt find a single doctor fit for major penalty. It was foreign experienced doctor, who lost her wife while travelling to india, who compelled MCI to take few such steps in recent time through various litigations in which MCI was seen taking side of negligent doctors but MCI was forced to swallow her words, & thereby tought some lessions in competency to MCI itself.

    It is therefore requested to give level playing field to foreign medical graduates by applying all the provisions of exit exam including the provisions of temporary registration uniformly in toto, in letter & in sprit to allow fair comparison of foreign medical graduates vis-a-vis medical mafia controlled private college graduates & let the country know the actual competency level of both.

    Uniform application of exit exam to all, even if he is a foreigner, is the established norm world over. USA ,Canada, austrailia, newzealand or even the least developed Nepal follow this principal. In our case, these foreign graduates are not even foreigners. They are the very sons of mother india.

    If at all india chooses to play in the hands of media mafia & likes of ketan desai in MCI once again & apply different yard stick for local & foreign graduates, which I am sure it will not, then india will have the dubious distinction of being the only country in the whole world, doing so.

    This will send wrong signals the world over that medical mafia & likes of ketan desai in MCI still prevails in the country irrespective of political party in power.

    I sincerely hope BJP will not let it happen.

    Thanking you,

    yours faithfully,

    (Rk agrawal)

    Copy to Respected Prime Minister of PMO India

    Copy to medical council of india

    Posted by: Anonymous | 4 years ago | Reply
  • https://www.change.org/p/2009

    https://www.change.org/p/2009230?just_created=true
    SIGN THE PETITION FOR HEALTY TOMORROW.
    We on behalf of PBMCI hearty congratulate health minister for innovative proposal of uniform exit exam for medical graduates to maintain uniformity in medical education. We also congratulate you for making it mandatory for permanent registration thereby overturning the malafide intention of MCI to avoid scrutiny of doctors produced under its own corrupt system. We also condemn the mci for having proposed exit exam to be optional there by attemptimg to shield competency of doctors produced by medical mafia controlled private colleges.
    Scores of dubious private medical college openly auction their seats in crores & pass them from their own private universities by taking crores again. People of india have every right to know if these graduates possess basic medical skills before allowing them to play with their life.

    Posted by: Anonymous | 4 years ago | Reply
  • People for

    People for betterment of
    Foreign Medical Graduates
    President: R K Agrawal,
    231, Lalbaug, Morbi-2
    Gujarat
    Dt.30.08.2014
    To,
    Health minister,
    Govt of India,
    New Delhi
    Sub:- Providing level playing field to foreign medical graduates.

    Ref:- 1. PBFMG letter dated 30.06.2014 titled ÔÇ£ Plight of foreign medical graduates & ways to improve supply of competent doctors while eliminating all types of incompetent doctors.
    2. PBFMG letter dated 30.06.2014 titled ÔÇÿ Plight of foreign medical graduatesÔÇÖ
    3. PBFMG letter dated 10.07.2014 titled ÔÇÿ National exit exam for medical graduates.

    R sir,
    We on behalf of PBFMG hearty congratulate you & the committee formed by your good self for having come up with the brilliant proposal of exit exam which ensures uniform standards in medical education by making it mandatory for permanent registration & at the same time not affecting supply by innovative provision of temporary registration.

    We also congratulate you & the committee to incorporate mandatory provisions to appear & pass the test for permanent registration, thereby overturning the malafide intention of MCI, giving option to local graduates to by pass the exam, to avoid scrutiny of doctors produced by medical mafia controlled private colleges under MCIÔÇÖs own corrupt system. Hope, its their last try to avoid scrutiny of doctors produced by these dubious colleges. Let the people know if their competency level before allowing them to play with their life.

    Scores of private medical colleges openly auction their seats in crores & pass them from their own private universities by taking crores again. Concerns regarding standards of education in such colleges are systematically overlooked by MCI, deciding their recognition & derecognition based on the weight of suitcase such colleges carry for likes of ketan desai in MCI.

    Foreign medical graduates, on the other hand, are the committed souls to this profession, having earned their admission in adverse terrains, without paying a single paisa by way of black money & donations to MCI or the medical mafia. Their admissions were till recently directly monitored by MCI by way of eligibility certificate. The process was much cleaner than the way private college mafia takes admission in their colleges by open auction of seats through daily advertisement in local newspapers.
    Still private college mafia in convenience with likes of ketan desai in MCI, having received no black money or donation from foreign students, has long been branding foreign graduates as incompetent by subjecting them to highly discriminatory level of screening test designed purposely to fail students to incite fear psychosis of not to go abroad & rather fall pray to private college seats, filled at huge donations. It is requested to direct MCI to desist itself from branding of foreign graduates as incompetent till relative level of competence is established by uniform application of exit exam to foreign graduates vis-a-viz medical mafia controlled private college graduates.

    MCI in its history since independence didnÔÇÖt find a single doctor fit for major penalty. It was foreign experienced doctor, who lost her wife while travelling to india, who compelled MCI to take few such steps in recent time through various litigations in which MCI was seen taking side of negligent doctors but MCI was forced to swallow her words, & thereby tought some lessions in competency to MCI itself.

    It is therefore requested to give level playing field to foreign medical graduates by applying all the provisions of exit exam including the provisions of temporary registration uniformly in toto, in letter & in sprit to allow fair comparison of foreign medical graduates vis-a-vis medical mafia controlled private college graduates & let the country know the actual competency level of both.

    Uniform application of exit exam to all, even if he is a foreigner, is the established norm world over. USA ,Canada, austrailia, newzealand or even the least developed Nepal follow this principal. In our case, these foreign graduates are not even foreigners. They are the very sons of mother india.

    If at all india chooses to play in the hands of media mafia & likes of ketan desai in MCI once again & apply different yard stick for local & foreign graduates, which I am sure it will not, then india will have the dubious distinction of being the only country in the whole world, doing so.

    This will send wrong signals the world over that medical mafia & likes of ketan desai in MCI still prevails in the country irrespective of political party in power.

    I sincerely hope BJP will not let it happen.

    Thanking you,

    yours faithfully,

    (Rk agrawal)

    Copy to Respected Prime Minister of PMO India

    Copy to medical council of india

    Posted by: Anonymous | 4 years ago | Reply
  • CONGRATULATIONS & HEARTLY

    CONGRATULATIONS & HEARTLY THANKS TO FIRST 100 SIGNATORIES. THEY R SUBMITTED TO PM, HM & MCI. I REQUEST EVERY SIGNATORY TO KINDLY MOTIVATE 10 MORE PEOPLE TO SIGN THE CAMPAIGN. NEXT TARGET IS 1000 SIGNATURES
    https://www.change.org/p/2009230?just_created=true
    SIGN THE PETITION FOR HEALTHY TOMORROW.
    We on behalf of PBMCI hearty congratulate health minister for innovative proposal of uniform exit exam for medical graduates to maintain uniformity in medical education. We also congratulate you for making it mandatory for permanent registration thereby overturning the malafide intention of MCI to avoid scrutiny of doctors produced under its own corrupt system. We also condemn the MCI for having proposed exit exam to be optional there by attempting to shield competency of doctors produced by medical mafia controlled private colleges.
    Scores of dubious private medical college openly auction their seats in crores & pass them from their own private universities by taking crores again. People of India have every right to know if these graduates possess basic medical skills before allowing them to play with their life

    Posted by: Anonymous | 4 years ago | Reply