Health

Depression, anxiety, trauma stress, bipolarity, schizophrenia: Unaccounted costs of conflicts

New estimates by WHO indicate the world has grossly underplayed the problem

 
By DTE Staff
Last Updated: Wednesday 12 June 2019
Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Nearly 9 per cent of those living in conflict zones suffer from moderate-to-severe mental health conditions, according to estimates by World Health Organization (WHO). Nearly 22 per cent of those living in periods of conflict suffer from depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

The estimates are way higher than previous global estimates of one in every 14 persons being affected such.

The new estimates are based on analysis of 129 studies published in medical journal the Lancet.

The study takes into account co-morbidity scenarios — the presence of one or more conditions — between depression and anxiety, the mean, and combined picture of mild, moderate, and severe depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and anxiety disorders.

The study also takes into account the co-morbidity scenario — the presence of one or more conditions — between depression and anxiety, the mean, and combined picture of mild, moderate, and severe depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and anxiety disorders.

Around 21.2 per cent people in conflict areas are affected by them at any given point. Depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and anxiety-related disorders are also more prevalent among such people, the study found. 

It analysed data from 39 countries conducted between 1983 and 2017.

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