Natural Disasters

Typhoon Megi kills 5, injures over 600 in Taiwan and China

After causing human casualties in Taiwan, the typhoon moved westward and made landfall in eastern China

 
By DTE Staff
Last Updated: Wednesday 28 September 2016 | 13:07:23 PM
Rainfall had crossed 300 millimeters (12 inches) in the south and eastern mountains of Taiwan. Credit:Rob and Stephanie Levy / Flicker
Rainfall had crossed 300 millimeters (12 inches) in the south and eastern mountains of Taiwan. Credit:Rob and Stephanie Levy / Flicker Rainfall had crossed 300 millimeters (12 inches) in the south and eastern mountains of Taiwan. Credit:Rob and Stephanie Levy / Flicker

At least 600 people were injured and five people were killed in Taiwan and China ever since Typhoon Megi made a landfall lon Tuesday afternoon. Three people died when a tour bus turned on its side in central Taiwan and one died in a truck crash. Heavy rain and wind (100 miles per hour) equivalent to the speed of a Category 4 hurricane sustained in the island long enough to cause displacement of thousands of people.

The alert levels for Taiwan had been raised since the country is prone to landslides and flooding. It was the third and perhaps the most damaging typhoon to affect Taiwan in the last two weeks.

Over 8,000 people, mostly from mountainous areas at risk of landslides or floods, were evacuated. On Taiping Mountain, 984mm of rain had fallen with 870mm on Tuesday alone. This amount of rain on a mountainside was enough to cause landslides. In fact, rainfall had crossed 300 millimeters (12 inches) in the south and eastern mountains of Taiwan.

Over 2.9 million households lost power, out of which about one million households saw the power being restored by late Tuesday. More than 121 flights were delayed and 253 cancelled at Taoyuan International Airport.

The mountain range that divides Taiwan into two not only enhances the rain but also disrupts the circulation of a typhoon. Hence, by the time the typhoon reached western Taiwan and the coast of mainland China, it had lost much of its intensity.

China under its grip

After uprooting trees and causing human casualties in Taiwan, the typhoon moved westward and made landfall in eastern China today. It weakened to a tropical storm after hitting the coastal city of Quanzhou in Fujian province. Wind speed was recorded up to 118 kilometers (74 miles) per hour.

Four counties and one city in Fujian province witnessed more than 300 mm of precipitation. The water level of local rivers has surpassed alert levels and an orange alert (penultimate warning) has already been issued. Just a week ago, Typhoon Meranti made landfall in the same region of China, killing at least 29 and causing economic loss worth $2.5 million.

Impact of Typhoon Megi on Hong Kong

Hong Kong recorded its hottest September day in more than 50 years on Tuesday with the influence of Typhoon Megi bringing “serious” levels of air pollution to the city for two successive days. In Happy Valley, the temperatures hit a high of 36°C. The tropical cyclone is expected to bring gloomy weather to Hong Kong over the next six days. The Environmental Protection Department issued a warning after the Air Quality Health Index in Tuen Mun and Tung Chung hit 10+ (the highest level) on Tuesday afternoon, indicating a serious health risk.

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