NETWORK

 
Last Updated: Saturday 04 July 2015

Photo on the Net
Subscribers would now be able to order photographs on the Internet. Eastman Kodak, a Germany based company, has launched services that would allow paid subscribers to store their pictures on the Internet and order reprints with the click of a mouse. Initially, the company expects to attract a few thousands subscribers. But in five years, it hopes that nearly one million people would ask for the services. Following a 90-day trial period, the basic fee for the service will be US $4.95 a month that would allow a subscriber to store 100 pictures on the Internet. By paying an extra fee of US $5 a roll, customers would get their pictures scanned electronically by photofinishers and posted on a password-coded Internet account.

Safety kit
Apart from browsing the Web to get information, one can also keep data safe with the Internet. Several Internet companies are now providing the services. Data backup could be kept outside the home or office, which would provide protection from theft and fire. On-line backup services include DataSafe, Personal Vault, SureFind, which can be availed by paying a monthly amount of US $10 to $25. To get these services, an user will have to download some free software from a Web site. The software will allow users specify about files to back up, and uploaded them to their server.

Net benefit
Internet can be a better tool to teach students than the conventional method such as class-room teaching, says Jerald Schutte at the California State University, Northridge. A study conducted on 33 sociology students suggest the on-line group that used Internet scored 20 per cent higher marks than the group that used the conventional method. It was found that they spent more time on coursework and understood the material better.

Subscribe to Weekly Newsletter :

Comments are moderated and will be published only after the site moderator’s approval. Please use a genuine email ID and provide your name. Selected comments may also be used in the ‘Letters’ section of the Down To Earth print edition.