Tuesday 31 December 2013

Author(s): Sugandh Juneja, Srestha Banerjee

'We are using the sea as a dustbin'

'We are using the sea as a dustbin'

The Indian coastline no longer belongs to its traditional custodians—the small fisher people. A jamboree of development—cities, SEZs, power plants, ports, sand mining—is eating up the coastline and eroding it beyond repair. Leading coastal fishermen against a proposed nuclear power plant at Haripur in West Bengal, Debasis Shyamal got sucked into a public movement at his doorstep. Later, as member of the National Fishworkers' Forum (NFF)—an apex body of marginal fishers uniting many a local movement—he travelled along India's coastline, witnessing the plight of fisher communities, from Gujarat to West Bengal. Earlier this month, NFF created its youth platform, Yuva, to bring forth the second rung of leadership within the organisation. Shyamal along with Malisa Simoes from Goa, took over as conveners of the youth wing. Sayantan Bera spoke to him in Kolkata on the present and future of traditional fishers

Fisher people pushed to the edge

Fisher people pushed to the edge

Development along coasts has left little space for fishing communities to carry out their activities. Their catch is also diminishing because of industrial fishing

'We are using the sea as a dustbin'

'We are using the sea as a dustbin'

The Indian coastline no longer belongs to its traditional custodians—the small fisher people. A jamboree of development—cities, SEZs, power plants, ports, sand mining—is eating up the coastline and eroding it beyond repair. Leading coastal fishermen against a proposed nuclear power plant at Haripur in West Bengal, Debasis Shyamal got sucked into a public movement at his doorstep. Later, as member of the National Fishworkers' Forum (NFF)—an apex body of marginal fishers uniting many a local movement—he travelled along India's coastline, witnessing the plight of fisher communities, from Gujarat to West Bengal. Earlier this month, NFF created its youth platform, Yuva, to bring forth the second rung of leadership within the organisation. Shyamal along with Malisa Simoes from Goa, took over as conveners of the youth wing. Sayantan Bera spoke to him in Kolkata on the present and future of traditional fishers

Author(s): Sayantan Bera

Fishers at bay

When it was introduced in 1991, Coastal Regulation Zone was a blanket notification to protect India's coast and fisherfolk. In 17 years, it was amended--diluted to favour industry--21 times. Now, a new line of management rules might give industry a free run at the cost of fishing communities and environmental concerns. An analysis

Fishers at bay

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  • Thanks for the insightful

    Thanks for the insightful article. I would like to know whether you found any many major vulnerability in the Digha- Sankarpur-Mandarmoni area of West Bengal coast? Do this region including the ecosystem and livelihood face any threat either human induced or natural?

    Posted by: Anonymous | 2 years ago | Reply
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