Climate Change

India has climate targets for 2030

Twenty years from now, India's per capita greenhouse gas emissions will be below the 2005 global average of 4.22 tonnes CO2-equivalent

 
By Sumana Narayanan
Last Updated: Wednesday 08 July 2015

TWENTY years from now, India's per capita greenhouse gas emissions will be below the 2005 global average of 4.22 tonnes CO2-equivalent. The estimate is the result of five studies carried out by various research bodies including The Energy and Resources Institute, a Delhibased non-profit. The Union ministry of environment and forests released the report on September 2.

Ministry officials said the report would be used in the climate change talks in Copenhagen in December. Minister of state for environment and forests Jairam Ramesh said the finding does not mean "a do-nothing strategy". "The government is trying to find ways to increase energy efficiency--there will be mandatory fuel efficiency standards for the transport sector by 2012."

UK's secretary of state for energy and climate change, Ed Miliband, who met Ramesh during his recent whirlwind tour of India and Bangladesh, said India's commitment to fighting climate change is impressive. He said the UK would contribute US$ 1 billion a year for mitigation of and adaptation to the effects of climate change in developing countries.

Talking to the media, Miliband said he and his colleague Douglas Alexander, secretary for international development, were visiting India to listen to the viewpoints of Indian ministers and negotiators. Asked about rumours that their trip to Bangladesh was meant to strike a separate deal on climate talks and wean the country from other developing countries (G77 plus China), Alexander said the trip was combined because of the geographical proximity between the two countries.

Miliband said the UK has pledged to reduce emissions by 34 per cent by 2020 and is willing to "go further as part of a global deal in Copenhagen."

TWENTY years from now, India's per capita greenhouse gas emissions will be below the 2005 global average of 4.22 tonnes CO2-equivalent. The estimate is the result of five studies carried out by various research bodies including The Energy and Resources Institute, a Delhibased non-profit. The Union ministry of environment and forests released the report on September 2.

Ministry officials said the report would be used in the climate change talks in Copenhagen in December. Minister of state for environment and forests Jairam Ramesh said the finding does not mean "a do-nothing strategy". "The government is trying to find ways to increase energy efficiency--there will be mandatory fuel efficiency standards for the transport sector by 2012."

UK's secretary of state for energy and climate change, Ed Miliband, who met Ramesh during his recent whirlwind tour of India and Bangladesh, said India's commitment to fighting climate change is impressive. He said the UK would contribute US$ 1 billion a year for mitigation of and adaptation to the effects of climate change in developing countries.

Talking to the media, Miliband said he and his colleague Douglas Alexander, secretary for international development, were visiting India to listen to the viewpoints of Indian ministers and negotiators. Asked about rumours that their trip to Bangladesh was meant to strike a separate deal on climate talks and wean the country from other developing countries (G77 plus China), Alexander said the trip was combined because of the geographical proximity between the two countries.

Miliband said the UK has pledged to reduce emissions by 34 per cent by 2020 and is willing to "go further as part of a global deal in Copenhagen."

 

Rich must take on steep cuts
Developed countries must prepare to take on high emission cuts and help developing countries pursue lowemission growth, stated a report on climate change challenges by the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs. Carbon trading and green taxes are unsuitable for developing countries. Hence, the preferred option is large-scale investment and technology transfer by developed countries that have contributed three-fourths of the global greenhouse
gas emissions since the 1950s, the report stated. UN estimates say future development projects will require additional investment of US$ 86 billion annually till 2016 to mitigate climate change challenges.

Since energy use is responsible for 60 per cent of the total emissions, reshaping energy systems is a must. The report suggests possible measures like a global energy fund, a reformed clean development mechanism and forest related financing mechanisms. The best option for developing and developed nations would be to jointly adopt climate targets, said the report.

--GAURI KASHYAP

 

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