Health

WHO estimates cost of reaching global health targets by 2030

Investments could prevent 97 million premature deaths globally between now and 2030

 
By DTE Staff
Last Updated: Wednesday 19 July 2017 | 13:02:28 PM
Credit: Flickr
Credit: Flickr Credit: Flickr

The World Health Organization (WHO) has published the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Health Price Tag in journal The Lancet Global Health. The analysis estimates the costs and benefits of progressively expanding health services in order to reach 16 SDG health targets in 67 low- and middle-income countries that account for 75 per cent of the world’s population.

The analysis shows that investments to expand services towards universal health coverage and the other SDG health targets could prevent 97 million premature deaths globally between now and 2030, and add as much as 8.4 years of life expectancy in some countries.

While most countries can afford the investments needed, the poorest nations will need assistance to reach the targets.

The SDG Health Price Tag models two scenarios: an "ambitious" scenario in which investments are sufficient for countries to attain the health targets in the SDGs by 2030; and a "progress" scenario in which countries get two-thirds or more of the way to the targets.

In both scenarios, health systems investments such as employing more health workers, building and operating new clinics, hospitals and laboratories, and buying medical equipment account for about 75 per cent of the total. The remaining costs are for medicines, vaccines, syringes and other commodities used to prevent or treat specific diseases, and for activities such as training, health campaigns and outreach to vulnerable communities.

Under the "ambitious" scenario, achieving the SDG health targets would require new investments increasing over time from an initial US$134 billion annually to US$371 billion, or $58 per person, by 2030.

The analysis shows that 85 per cent of these costs can be met with domestic resources, although as many as 32 of the world’s poorest countries will face an annual gap of up to US$54 billion and will continue to need external assistance. High-income countries were not included in the analysis but other estimates show they can all afford to provide universal health coverage with essential health services to their citizens.

The ambitious scenario includes adding more than 23 million health workers, and building more than 415, 000 new health facilities, 91 per cent of which would be primary health care centres.

These investments would boost health spending as a proportion of gross domestic product across all 67 countries from an average of 5.6 per cent to 7.5 per cent. The global average for health spending as a proportion of GDP is 9.9 per cent. Although higher spending does not necessarily translate to improved health, making the right investments at the right time can.

The investments could prevent 97 million premature deaths – one every five seconds over 15 years – including more than 50 million infants and children who are either stillborn or die before their fifth birthday, and 20 million deaths from non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. Life expectancy would increase by between 3.1 and 8.4 years, and 535 million years of healthy living would be added across the 67 countries.

The "progress" scenario would require new investments increasing from an initial $104 billion a year to $274 billion, or $41 per person, by 2030. These investments would prevent about 71 million premature deaths and boost health spending as a proportion of GDP to an average of 6.5 per cent. More than 14 million new health workers would be added, and nearly 378, 000 new health facilities built, 93 per cent of which would be primary health care centres.

The analysis includes targets in Sustainable Development Goal 3 (health and well-being) as well as targets from Goal 2 (zero hunger), Goal 6 (clean water and sanitation) and Goal 7 (affordable and clean energy). Some targets and diseases were excluded because of the difficulty of estimating their associated costs and health impact, or a lack of robust data.

WHO plans to update the estimates every five years and will include other health-related targets and diseases as more evidence becomes available.

Subscribe to Weekly Newsletter :

Related Story:

World Health Assembly agrees to new ‘Health Emergencies Programme’

World’s life expectancy up but gains uneven finds World Health Statistics 2016

Economic Survey low on health; public health infrastructure may take a backseat

IEP Resources:

Financing transformative health systems towards achievement of the health Sustainable Development Goals: a model for projected resource needs in 67 low-income and middle-income countries

World Health Statistics 2017- Monitoring Health for the SDGs

World report on health policy and systems research

Achieving the malaria MDG target: reversing the incidence of malaria 2000–2015

Avoiding 40% of the premature deaths in each country, 2010—30: review of national mortality trends to help quantify the UN Sustainable Development Goal for health

We are a voice to you; you have been a support to us. Together we build journalism that is independent, credible and fearless. You can further help us by making a donation. This will mean a lot for our ability to bring you news, perspectives and analysis from the ground so that we can make change together.

Comments are moderated and will be published only after the site moderator’s approval. Please use a genuine email ID and provide your name. Selected comments may also be used in the ‘Letters’ section of the Down To Earth print edition.