Natural Disasters

Alaska's North Slope hit by most powerful earthquake

The last most powerful quake in the North Slope was in 1995 at 5.2, and the jump to 6.4 is significant because earthquakes rapidly grow in strength as magnitude rises

 
By DTE Staff
Last Updated: Monday 13 August 2018
Alaska, North Slope
Credit: Shore Zone/Flickr Credit: Shore Zone/Flickr

On Sunday, Alaska's North Slope was hit by the most powerful earthquake ever recorded in the region, according to news reports. Morning 6:58 a.m., the 6.4 earthquake struck an area 42 miles east of Kavik River Camp and 343 miles northeast of Fairbanks, the state's second-biggest city.

With a depth of about 6 miles, the quake is being called the biggest recorded in the North Slope by a substantial amount.

The last most powerful quake in the North Slope was in 1995 at 5.2, and the jump is significant because earthquakes rapidly grow in strength as magnitude rises.

Another report says that the quake had no impact on operations of the Trans Alaska Pipeline system that carries North Slope crude 800 miles (1,300 km) to a marine terminal at Valdez.

At 7:14 a.m., a magnitude 5.1 earthquake hit another area in northern Alaska. The earthquake hit a spot about 340 miles northeast of Fairbanks.

Earthquakes were felt across the eastern part of the state's North Slope Borough and as far south as metro Fairbanks, says the report. There were no reports of damage.

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