Environment

Rain record: Odisha gets more than double, Bihar may soon be drought-hit

While 22 districts in Odisha see 200 per cent more rainfall than normal, Bihar’s 22 districts get less than 50 per cent

 
By Akshit Sangomla
Last Updated: Tuesday 24 July 2018 | 05:29:55 AM
In many Indian states, amidst the growing seasonal deficit of rainfall, there still remain a few places that received excess rainfall on a few days. Credit: Vikas Choudhary
In many Indian states, amidst the growing seasonal deficit of rainfall, there still remain a few places that received excess rainfall on a few days. Credit: Vikas Choudhary In many Indian states, amidst the growing seasonal deficit of rainfall, there still remain a few places that received excess rainfall on a few days. Credit: Vikas Choudhary

Heavy rainfall in the past few days including yesterday (July 22) has brought the state of Odisha to a standstill. Some places have received extreme amounts of rainfall triggering alarm bells for imminent floods. For example, on Sunday, Burla received a whopping 622 mm of rainfall which was the highest rainfall the state has ever seen, breaking a 26-year-old record of 582 mm recorded in Sambalpur. Three people have died till date in rain-related incidents in the state.

According to the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD), 22 districts in the state have received more than 200 per cent rainfall. In 12 of these districts, the rainfall is more than 500 per cent and in three of them the excess rainfall touches 1,000 per cent mark. Sambalpur, Subarnapur and Kendraparha received 265 mm, 216 mm and 81 mm of rainfall which are 1333 per cent, 1747 per cent and 1091 per cent of their normal rainfall. The rainfall has been attributed to a depression formed in the north-west Bay of Bengal and travelled towards Odisha, Bengal, Jharkhand and Chhattisgarh.

The IMD has warned seven states—Odisha, West Bengal, Jharkhand, Chhattisgarh, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh and Telangana—of heavy rainfall on July 23 and July 24.

Entire state’s not in deficit

Across states in India, amidst the growing seasonal deficit of rainfall there still remain a few places that receive excess rainfall on a few days. One example of that is Manipur. It had an overall deficit of 44 per cent on Sunday and is reeling under a seasonal deficit (June 1 to July 22) of 71 per cent but Thoubal district received 567 per cent more rainfall than its normal share.

As many as 74 districts spanning 18 states across the country have received 200 per cent excess rainfall. Bikaner in Rajasthan recorded 39.5 mm rainfall while its normal rainfall is just 1.8 mm. This means the city saw 20 times more rain on July 22 than it normally does.

Picture not as green everywhere

On the other hand, most of Bihar might be staring at drought this season with all of its 38 districts except two receiving less than normal rainfall this season. Only Banka and Pachim Champaran have received excess rainfall of 9 per cent and 1 per cent.

In 22 of these districts, the situation is rather dire. They have received at least 50 per cent deficit rainfall since June 1. These districts comprise of more than half the state by area. Nine of these districts have received 70 per cent less than normal rainfall. Vaishali has seen the leanest season in terms of rainfall with a deficit of 85 per cent. Bihar has an overall deficit this season of 47 per cent.

But even in this pall of gloom, some districts in the state have received more than normal rainfall on July 22. Aurangabad, Bhabua and Jahanabad received 721 per cent, 493 per cent and 244 per cent more rainfall than normal. But this rainfall could prove to be too late to alter the situation in the state.

Excess rainfall across states in the last 24 hours (districts that got more than 200% rain):

Sr no

District

Excess rainfall (%)

 

Odisha

 

1

Angul

624

2

Balangir

271

3

Baleshwar

287

4

Baragarh

927

5

Bhadrak

598

6

Cuttack

360

7

Deogarh

244

8

Dhenkanal

691

9

Ganjam

762

10

Jajapur

869

11

Jharsuguda

458

12

Kalahandi

301

13

Kandhamal

925

14

Kendraparha

1091

15

Kendujhar

481

16

Khordha

379

17

Mayurbhanj

286

18

Nayagarh

600

19

Puri

921

20

Sambalpur

1333

21

Subarnapur

1747

22

Sundargarh

226

 

 

 

 

Haryana

 

23

Gurgaon

231

24

Karnal

352

25

Mewat

495

26

Yamunanagar

562

 

 

 

 

Gujarat

 

27

Surat

387

 

 

 

 

Bengal

 

28

North 24 Paraganas

266

29

Paschim Medinipur

369

30

Puruliya

316

 

 

 

 

Assam

 

31

Golaghat

319

32

Udalgiri

212

 

 

 

 

Manipur

 

33

Thoubal

567

 

 

 

 

Tripura

 

34

North Tripura

231

 

 

 

 

Jharkhand

 

35

Paschim Singhbhumi

627

36

Purbi Singhbhumi

618

 

 

 

 

Bihar

 

37

Aurangabad

721

38

Bhabua

493

39

Jahanabad

244

 

 

 

 

Uttar Pradesh

 

40

Azamgarh

203

41

Gazipur

381

42

Jaunpur

219

43

Mirzapur

376

44

Aligarh

704

45

Badaun

339

46

Gautambudhnagar

921

47

Ghaziabad

252

48

Jhansi

202

49

Jyotibaphule nagar

476

50

Mahamayanagar

763

51

Sharanpur

1180

 

Uttarakhand

 

52

Bageshwar

560

 

 

 

 

Punjab

 

53

Bhatinda

229

54

Faridkot

817

55

Mansa

242

56

Patiala

219

57

Sas nagar

705

 

 

 

 

Himachal Pradesh

 

58

Sirmaur

222

 

 

 

 

Jammu and Kashmir

 

59

Baramulla

405

 

 

 

 

Rajasthan

 

60

Bikaner

2096

61

Ganganagar

671

62

Alwar

344

63

Bharatpur

465

64

Dholpur

392

65

Karauli

272

66

Sawai Madhopur

466

 

 

 

 

Madhya Pradesh

 

67

Gwalior

270

68

Jabalpur

363

69

Tikamgarh

949

 

 

 

 

Chhattisgarh

 

70

Durg

352

71

Kanker

420

72

Mahasamund

347

73

Raigarh

329

 

 

 

 

Tamil Nadu

 

74

Coimbatore

374

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