Letters

 
Published: Friday 10 July 2015

Pick of the post bag

More about the sacred groves
The article 'A profane proposal' (Down To Earth, Vol 12, No 15, December 31, 2003) has been a well-thought piece. But it expects too much from the sacred groves (sg) in terms of conservation.

Firstly, one must understand that local people need not necessarily protect these patches for resources. Conservation is a new age perspective, with little awarness on the same. sgs happen to be pockets of near natural vegetation.

The article has largely neglected (except some reference to Western Maharashtra Temple Committee, Kolhapur) the ownership and management dimensions where large number of sgs are owned and managed by private owners and trusts without much exposure to conservation issues but solely on the basis of residual faith.

Secondly, the article looks only at select pockets of sgs. It does not look into buffer zones for sgs, the surrounding areas or places such a feature is absent, as shown in the photo from Megahlaya. Little wonder that people encroach into the only available resources which have been there since their forefathers.

A look into other ecosystems such as Machhiyaal in Himalayan states, conserved due to similar beliefs like sgs, would have beefed the story further. It would have helped to get an inventory from researchers in this field.

Although our work at the Centre for Ecological Science has been mentioned in the article and direct quotes taken, the original reference hasn't been included.

For example, in the number of sgs and distribution, the interpretation of the numbers is done wrongly. The number of sgs we have quoted is basically those that have been documented in a study. That does not mean that there are only that many sgs.

Hope these comments will help your team.

YOGESH GOKHALE
Centre for Ecological Sciences
Bangalore
...

Pick of the post bag

More about the sacred groves
The article 'A profane proposal' (Down To Earth, Vol 12, No 15, December 31, 2003) has been a well-thought piece. But it expects too much from the sacred groves (sg) in terms of conservation.

Firstly, one must understand that local people need not necessarily protect these patches for resources. Conservation is a new age perspective, with little awarness on the same. sgs happen to be pockets of near natural vegetation.

The article has largely neglected (except some reference to Western Maharashtra Temple Committee, Kolhapur) the ownership and management dimensions where large number of sgs are owned and managed by private owners and trusts without much exposure to conservation issues but solely on the basis of residual faith.

Secondly, the article looks only at select pockets of sgs. It does not look into buffer zones for sgs, the surrounding areas or places such a feature is absent, as shown in the photo from Megahlaya. Little wonder that people encroach into the only available resources which have been there since their forefathers.

A look into other ecosystems such as Machhiyaal in Himalayan states, conserved due to similar beliefs like sgs, would have beefed the story further. It would have helped to get an inventory from researchers in this field.

Although our work at the Centre for Ecological Science has been mentioned in the article and direct quotes taken, the original reference hasn't been included.

For example, in the number of sgs and distribution, the interpretation of the numbers is done wrongly. The number of sgs we have quoted is basically those that have been documented in a study. That does not mean that there are only that many sgs.

Hope these comments will help your team.

YOGESH GOKHALE
Centre for Ecological Sciences
Bangalore
...

Pick of the post bag

More about the sacred groves
The article 'A profane proposal' (Down To Earth, Vol 12, No 15, December 31, 2003) has been a well-thought piece. But it expects too much from the sacred groves (sg) in terms of conservation.

Firstly, one must understand that local people need not necessarily protect these patches for resources. Conservation is a new age perspective, with little awarness on the same. sgs happen to be pockets of near natural vegetation.

The article has largely neglected (except some reference to Western Maharashtra Temple Committee, Kolhapur) the ownership and management dimensions where large number of sgs are owned and managed by private owners and trusts without much exposure to conservation issues but solely on the basis of residual faith.

Secondly, the article looks only at select pockets of sgs. It does not look into buffer zones for sgs, the surrounding areas or places such a feature is absent, as shown in the photo from Megahlaya. Little wonder that people encroach into the only available resources which have been there since their forefathers.

A look into other ecosystems such as Machhiyaal in Himalayan states, conserved due to similar beliefs like sgs, would have beefed the story further. It would have helped to get an inventory from researchers in this field.

Although our work at the Centre for Ecological Science has been mentioned in the article and direct quotes taken, the original reference hasn't been included.

For example, in the number of sgs and distribution, the interpretation of the numbers is done wrongly. The number of sgs we have quoted is basically those that have been documented in a study. That does not mean that there are only that many sgs.

Hope these comments will help your team.

YOGESH GOKHALE
Centre for Ecological Sciences
Bangalore
...

Why we prize the hen

Arindam Mitra's incisive article on Cable and Satellite advertising exploits the rural-urban schism, as the article 'Honey, I shrunk the other world' (Down To Earth, Vol 12, No 16, January 15, 2004) reveals. One must admit that the power of advertising shapes the market. It brings to mind an old jingle:

"The codfish lays ten thousand eggs
The homely hen lays one
The codfish never cackles
To tell you what she's done
And so we scorn the codfish
While the humble hen we prize
Which only goes to show you
That it pays to advertise..."

R P SUBRAMANIAN
Mayur Vihar, New Delhi...

Why we prize the hen

Arindam Mitra's incisive article on Cable and Satellite advertising exploits the rural-urban schism, as the article 'Honey, I shrunk the other world' (Down To Earth, Vol 12, No 16, January 15, 2004) reveals. One must admit that the power of advertising shapes the market. It brings to mind an old jingle:

"The codfish lays ten thousand eggs
The homely hen lays one
The codfish never cackles
To tell you what she's done
And so we scorn the codfish
While the humble hen we prize
Which only goes to show you
That it pays to advertise..."

R P SUBRAMANIAN
Mayur Vihar, New Delhi...

Why we prize the hen

Arindam Mitra's incisive article on Cable and Satellite advertising exploits the rural-urban schism, as the article 'Honey, I shrunk the other world' (Down To Earth, Vol 12, No 16, January 15, 2004) reveals. One must admit that the power of advertising shapes the market. It brings to mind an old jingle:

"The codfish lays ten thousand eggs
The homely hen lays one
The codfish never cackles
To tell you what she's done
And so we scorn the codfish
While the humble hen we prize
Which only goes to show you
That it pays to advertise..."

R P SUBRAMANIAN
Mayur Vihar, New Delhi...

MP's glorious 10 years

The editorial 'Development is not a road' (Down To Earth, Vol 12, No 14, December 15, 2003) calls for introspection by every adult citizen in the country who makes a choice while casting his vote. The recent assembly elections in Madhya Pradesh (mp) has proved that what finally wins a vote is not issues such as health, education, or gram samaj (village society) but secondary issues such as sadaks and bijili.

Under the Digvijay Singh government, for over 10 years, the state saw a rise in literacy rates and a dip in mortality rates. More girl children in the tribal belts were enrolled in schools and actually continued with their education, bringing the state on par with Karnataka, for female literacy. Women and children were getting medical help thus increasing life expectancy. undp Human Development Reports qualify mp as no longer being a bhimaru (sick) state.

The Panchayat's pani roko abhiyan (stop water campaign) initiated recharging groundwater and protecting water bodies that proved a viable answer to mp's drought problems since 2001. Satellite pictures of mp in 2003 showed an increase in forest area and green fields, making the biodiversity resources larger than when last seen in 1990.

So finally, what are the lessons we learn from the mp elections? That Digvijay Singh's team should have marketed their achievements during the elections, so that the hidden areas of progress would have been noticed, unlike the sadaks and the bijili, which gained prominence. That people remember to say 'thank you' when you are in office and vote you out with a 'sorry', sealed by a ballot vote. That public memory is short and voting is often coloured by moods and 'season change'. People in mp will soon realize that the 'saffron hava' (saffron wind) will not immediately get them sadaks or bijili but only more blessings from 'Jai Ram'.

MANU N KULKARNI
Bangalore...

MP's glorious 10 years

The editorial 'Development is not a road' (Down To Earth, Vol 12, No 14, December 15, 2003) calls for introspection by every adult citizen in the country who makes a choice while casting his vote. The recent assembly elections in Madhya Pradesh (mp) has proved that what finally wins a vote is not issues such as health, education, or gram samaj (village society) but secondary issues such as sadaks and bijili.

Under the Digvijay Singh government, for over 10 years, the state saw a rise in literacy rates and a dip in mortality rates. More girl children in the tribal belts were enrolled in schools and actually continued with their education, bringing the state on par with Karnataka, for female literacy. Women and children were getting medical help thus increasing life expectancy. undp Human Development Reports qualify mp as no longer being a bhimaru (sick) state.

The Panchayat's pani roko abhiyan (stop water campaign) initiated recharging groundwater and protecting water bodies that proved a viable answer to mp's drought problems since 2001. Satellite pictures of mp in 2003 showed an increase in forest area and green fields, making the biodiversity resources larger than when last seen in 1990.

So finally, what are the lessons we learn from the mp elections? That Digvijay Singh's team should have marketed their achievements during the elections, so that the hidden areas of progress would have been noticed, unlike the sadaks and the bijili, which gained prominence. That people remember to say 'thank you' when you are in office and vote you out with a 'sorry', sealed by a ballot vote. That public memory is short and voting is often coloured by moods and 'season change'. People in mp will soon realize that the 'saffron hava' (saffron wind) will not immediately get them sadaks or bijili but only more blessings from 'Jai Ram'.

MANU N KULKARNI
Bangalore...

MP's glorious 10 years

The editorial 'Development is not a road' (Down To Earth, Vol 12, No 14, December 15, 2003) calls for introspection by every adult citizen in the country who makes a choice while casting his vote. The recent assembly elections in Madhya Pradesh (mp) has proved that what finally wins a vote is not issues such as health, education, or gram samaj (village society) but secondary issues such as sadaks and bijili.

Under the Digvijay Singh government, for over 10 years, the state saw a rise in literacy rates and a dip in mortality rates. More girl children in the tribal belts were enrolled in schools and actually continued with their education, bringing the state on par with Karnataka, for female literacy. Women and children were getting medical help thus increasing life expectancy. undp Human Development Reports qualify mp as no longer being a bhimaru (sick) state.

The Panchayat's pani roko abhiyan (stop water campaign) initiated recharging groundwater and protecting water bodies that proved a viable answer to mp's drought problems since 2001. Satellite pictures of mp in 2003 showed an increase in forest area and green fields, making the biodiversity resources larger than when last seen in 1990.

So finally, what are the lessons we learn from the mp elections? That Digvijay Singh's team should have marketed their achievements during the elections, so that the hidden areas of progress would have been noticed, unlike the sadaks and the bijili, which gained prominence. That people remember to say 'thank you' when you are in office and vote you out with a 'sorry', sealed by a ballot vote. That public memory is short and voting is often coloured by moods and 'season change'. People in mp will soon realize that the 'saffron hava' (saffron wind) will not immediately get them sadaks or bijili but only more blessings from 'Jai Ram'.

MANU N KULKARNI
Bangalore...

Slow poison

'Defining Safety' (Down To Earth, Vol 12, No 15, December 31, 2003) showed the presence of toxic elements in ground/surface water caused by pesticides. Research proves that the maximum residue level in pesticides keeps changing with time. Unfortunately, our country cannot adopt European or American norms to maintain standards in manufacturing. We need to look within our available resources and tap the strength we have in natural remedies. Use of organic manure and pesticides, will provide a healthy respite from the slow poison. What we need to remember is that organic farming is not the only solution to India's ailments. Clean, potable water, clean toilets and smokeless chullahs are necessities, too.

BRIJESH BARTHWAL
barthwalk@sancharnet.in

Government legislations may take ages to become reality. Even if it's a short-term solution, private initiatives may provide an answer. Perhaps the Centre for Science and Environment (cse) can contribute their expertise.

Years ago, in Europe the battle against polluted foods started with the public being informed of what options they had in their diet. cse could do something similar and recommend ways to avoid/reduce polluted foods.

cse could become a regulatory body where it would provide a quality logo for products/brands, which comply with international standards rather than Indian ones. Indian food producers could send their products to the cse laboratory for testing. Maybe there could be a fee for the same, making it a way for cse to utilize the funds for research.

Today's Indian consumer would be prepared to pay a little more if he knows that the product is safe for his family.

FIONNA PRINS
fionna.prins@vsnl.com...

Slow poison

'Defining Safety' (Down To Earth, Vol 12, No 15, December 31, 2003) showed the presence of toxic elements in ground/surface water caused by pesticides. Research proves that the maximum residue level in pesticides keeps changing with time. Unfortunately, our country cannot adopt European or American norms to maintain standards in manufacturing. We need to look within our available resources and tap the strength we have in natural remedies. Use of organic manure and pesticides, will provide a healthy respite from the slow poison. What we need to remember is that organic farming is not the only solution to India's ailments. Clean, potable water, clean toilets and smokeless chullahs are necessities, too.

BRIJESH BARTHWAL
barthwalk@sancharnet.in

Government legislations may take ages to become reality. Even if it's a short-term solution, private initiatives may provide an answer. Perhaps the Centre for Science and Environment (cse) can contribute their expertise.

Years ago, in Europe the battle against polluted foods started with the public being informed of what options they had in their diet. cse could do something similar and recommend ways to avoid/reduce polluted foods.

cse could become a regulatory body where it would provide a quality logo for products/brands, which comply with international standards rather than Indian ones. Indian food producers could send their products to the cse laboratory for testing. Maybe there could be a fee for the same, making it a way for cse to utilize the funds for research.

Today's Indian consumer would be prepared to pay a little more if he knows that the product is safe for his family.

FIONNA PRINS
fionna.prins@vsnl.com...

Slow poison

'Defining Safety' (Down To Earth, Vol 12, No 15, December 31, 2003) showed the presence of toxic elements in ground/surface water caused by pesticides. Research proves that the maximum residue level in pesticides keeps changing with time. Unfortunately, our country cannot adopt European or American norms to maintain standards in manufacturing. We need to look within our available resources and tap the strength we have in natural remedies. Use of organic manure and pesticides, will provide a healthy respite from the slow poison. What we need to remember is that organic farming is not the only solution to India's ailments. Clean, potable water, clean toilets and smokeless chullahs are necessities, too.

BRIJESH BARTHWAL
barthwalk@sancharnet.in

Government legislations may take ages to become reality. Even if it's a short-term solution, private initiatives may provide an answer. Perhaps the Centre for Science and Environment (cse) can contribute their expertise.

Years ago, in Europe the battle against polluted foods started with the public being informed of what options they had in their diet. cse could do something similar and recommend ways to avoid/reduce polluted foods.

cse could become a regulatory body where it would provide a quality logo for products/brands, which comply with international standards rather than Indian ones. Indian food producers could send their products to the cse laboratory for testing. Maybe there could be a fee for the same, making it a way for cse to utilize the funds for research.

Today's Indian consumer would be prepared to pay a little more if he knows that the product is safe for his family.

FIONNA PRINS
fionna.prins@vsnl.com...

Sacred spaces

The article 'A profane proposal' (Down To Earth, Vol 12, No 15, December 31, 2003) shows how sacred groves are today open to vandalism. It is believed that in Chitrakoot, Madhya Pradesh, a pilgrim centre, anyone who dares to willfully damage the sacred van meets with punishment. Only such fear can save these sacred and prized trees that hold within them rich treasures. Temple committees should be encouraged to protect and preserve these daiva vanas. Government should participate in preserving such rare species of trees. Sacred groves known as daiva van, devara kadus should receive special protection. This could serve as a model in conservation for others.

D B N MURTHY
Bangalore...

Sacred spaces

The article 'A profane proposal' (Down To Earth, Vol 12, No 15, December 31, 2003) shows how sacred groves are today open to vandalism. It is believed that in Chitrakoot, Madhya Pradesh, a pilgrim centre, anyone who dares to willfully damage the sacred van meets with punishment. Only such fear can save these sacred and prized trees that hold within them rich treasures. Temple committees should be encouraged to protect and preserve these daiva vanas. Government should participate in preserving such rare species of trees. Sacred groves known as daiva van, devara kadus should receive special protection. This could serve as a model in conservation for others.

D B N MURTHY
Bangalore...

Sacred spaces

The article 'A profane proposal' (Down To Earth, Vol 12, No 15, December 31, 2003) shows how sacred groves are today open to vandalism. It is believed that in Chitrakoot, Madhya Pradesh, a pilgrim centre, anyone who dares to willfully damage the sacred van meets with punishment. Only such fear can save these sacred and prized trees that hold within them rich treasures. Temple committees should be encouraged to protect and preserve these daiva vanas. Government should participate in preserving such rare species of trees. Sacred groves known as daiva van, devara kadus should receive special protection. This could serve as a model in conservation for others.

D B N MURTHY
Bangalore...

Livestock danger

The article on 'Horns locked' (Down To Earth, Vol 12, No 14, December 15, 2003) seems to go hand in hand with the scientists' attempts to provide solutions to livestock in drought-affected regions. While, on one hand, conservationists are doing their bit to keep the feral goats (domestic gone wild, not wild species), off the Barren Island in Andaman and Nicobar islands, your correspondent Sanjib Kumar Roy is justifying their existence! The goats are as necessary to the island's ecosystem as plague to humans.

JANAKI LENIN
draco@vsnl.com...

Livestock danger

The article on 'Horns locked' (Down To Earth, Vol 12, No 14, December 15, 2003) seems to go hand in hand with the scientists' attempts to provide solutions to livestock in drought-affected regions. While, on one hand, conservationists are doing their bit to keep the feral goats (domestic gone wild, not wild species), off the Barren Island in Andaman and Nicobar islands, your correspondent Sanjib Kumar Roy is justifying their existence! The goats are as necessary to the island's ecosystem as plague to humans.

JANAKI LENIN
draco@vsnl.com...

Livestock danger

The article on 'Horns locked' (Down To Earth, Vol 12, No 14, December 15, 2003) seems to go hand in hand with the scientists' attempts to provide solutions to livestock in drought-affected regions. While, on one hand, conservationists are doing their bit to keep the feral goats (domestic gone wild, not wild species), off the Barren Island in Andaman and Nicobar islands, your correspondent Sanjib Kumar Roy is justifying their existence! The goats are as necessary to the island's ecosystem as plague to humans.

JANAKI LENIN
draco@vsnl.com...

Trees first, golf later

The Supreme Court (sc) order on January 8, 2004 stayed the construction of a golf course in Goregaon, Mumbai. The decision taken by Justice Ruma Pal and Justice S B Sinha is a welcome development for environmentalists and citizens of the city.

This revokes the September 2003 Bombay High Court order to the Byramje Jeejeebhoy group and the Usha Madhu Development Housing Society. The joint developers were given the sanction to construct an 18-hole gold course on a 550-acre plot, which would actually mean destroying acres of mango groves. This High Court ad-interim order seemed to lack foresight simply because the construction would mean violating the Coastal Regulation Zone-I rules (1991) and the Environment Protection Act (1986).

The developers provided false information in 1995 to the Ministry of Forest and Environment. Although permission was given in 1996, it was annulled later when residents and satellite images testified the existence of dense groves even before 1995. The sc stay order therefore provides a ray of hope that ecological issues could get a sensitive hearing in the future.

G R VORA
Sion, Mumbai...

Trees first, golf later

The Supreme Court (sc) order on January 8, 2004 stayed the construction of a golf course in Goregaon, Mumbai. The decision taken by Justice Ruma Pal and Justice S B Sinha is a welcome development for environmentalists and citizens of the city.

This revokes the September 2003 Bombay High Court order to the Byramje Jeejeebhoy group and the Usha Madhu Development Housing Society. The joint developers were given the sanction to construct an 18-hole gold course on a 550-acre plot, which would actually mean destroying acres of mango groves. This High Court ad-interim order seemed to lack foresight simply because the construction would mean violating the Coastal Regulation Zone-I rules (1991) and the Environment Protection Act (1986).

The developers provided false information in 1995 to the Ministry of Forest and Environment. Although permission was given in 1996, it was annulled later when residents and satellite images testified the existence of dense groves even before 1995. The sc stay order therefore provides a ray of hope that ecological issues could get a sensitive hearing in the future.

G R VORA
Sion, Mumbai...

Trees first, golf later

The Supreme Court (sc) order on January 8, 2004 stayed the construction of a golf course in Goregaon, Mumbai. The decision taken by Justice Ruma Pal and Justice S B Sinha is a welcome development for environmentalists and citizens of the city.

This revokes the September 2003 Bombay High Court order to the Byramje Jeejeebhoy group and the Usha Madhu Development Housing Society. The joint developers were given the sanction to construct an 18-hole gold course on a 550-acre plot, which would actually mean destroying acres of mango groves. This High Court ad-interim order seemed to lack foresight simply because the construction would mean violating the Coastal Regulation Zone-I rules (1991) and the Environment Protection Act (1986).

The developers provided false information in 1995 to the Ministry of Forest and Environment. Although permission was given in 1996, it was annulled later when residents and satellite images testified the existence of dense groves even before 1995. The sc stay order therefore provides a ray of hope that ecological issues could get a sensitive hearing in the future.

G R VORA
Sion, Mumbai...

Nature's retribution

It is no longer news to read of a leopard sighted in a residential area in Powai, Mumbai. What prompts anxiety is that an innocent child was victim of the leopard's attack. The Powai lake and its surroundings provide the perfect breathing space for Mumbai's growing human jungle. Nature seems to be returning with vengeance what we humans have given it. The hills, a masterpiece of Nature today is turned into artificially beautified gardens. The Nature Park has a huge residential complex on the outside, all in the name of a golf club. Luxury hotels trespass into the already drying Powai lake. There's little thought given to the rising population and growing traffic in this area. Why not explore areas in unutilised Navi Mumbai?

The death of the child shows us the direct results of our maiming the environment. Long-term effects of such mangling would mean diseases on the rise. Not to mention, the physiological and psychological stress on man.

The Chief Minister has endorsed high-rise structures in the city thus putting an end to open spaces. There will be no saltpans, no mango groves, no Aarey Milk Colony. Mumbai will turn into a fully 'developed' city, chocking on itself and inviting leopards, real and metaphorical to maul us. Is this the Shanghai we want?

S K SAKSENA
Powai, Mumbai...

Nature's retribution

It is no longer news to read of a leopard sighted in a residential area in Powai, Mumbai. What prompts anxiety is that an innocent child was victim of the leopard's attack. The Powai lake and its surroundings provide the perfect breathing space for Mumbai's growing human jungle. Nature seems to be returning with vengeance what we humans have given it. The hills, a masterpiece of Nature today is turned into artificially beautified gardens. The Nature Park has a huge residential complex on the outside, all in the name of a golf club. Luxury hotels trespass into the already drying Powai lake. There's little thought given to the rising population and growing traffic in this area. Why not explore areas in unutilised Navi Mumbai?

The death of the child shows us the direct results of our maiming the environment. Long-term effects of such mangling would mean diseases on the rise. Not to mention, the physiological and psychological stress on man.

The Chief Minister has endorsed high-rise structures in the city thus putting an end to open spaces. There will be no saltpans, no mango groves, no Aarey Milk Colony. Mumbai will turn into a fully 'developed' city, chocking on itself and inviting leopards, real and metaphorical to maul us. Is this the Shanghai we want?

S K SAKSENA
Powai, Mumbai...

Nature's retribution

It is no longer news to read of a leopard sighted in a residential area in Powai, Mumbai. What prompts anxiety is that an innocent child was victim of the leopard's attack. The Powai lake and its surroundings provide the perfect breathing space for Mumbai's growing human jungle. Nature seems to be returning with vengeance what we humans have given it. The hills, a masterpiece of Nature today is turned into artificially beautified gardens. The Nature Park has a huge residential complex on the outside, all in the name of a golf club. Luxury hotels trespass into the already drying Powai lake. There's little thought given to the rising population and growing traffic in this area. Why not explore areas in unutilised Navi Mumbai?

The death of the child shows us the direct results of our maiming the environment. Long-term effects of such mangling would mean diseases on the rise. Not to mention, the physiological and psychological stress on man.

The Chief Minister has endorsed high-rise structures in the city thus putting an end to open spaces. There will be no saltpans, no mango groves, no Aarey Milk Colony. Mumbai will turn into a fully 'developed' city, chocking on itself and inviting leopards, real and metaphorical to maul us. Is this the Shanghai we want?

S K SAKSENA
Powai, Mumbai...

The 'other' thought

Let us stop for a minute and look at Kyoto without the anti-us coloured glasses. Not that they are innocent but on glancing at Dar es Salaam's ecological system, they may have a point in getting poor countries covered under the Kyoto Insurance. An exempted community member (non-industrial country) in the Kyoto Protocol, Dar es Salaam is losing innumerable acres of national forest area because of an energy crisis. Should the trend continue, by 2050, with a population then reaching a 70 million, the land would be barren. The country's environment crisis can be blamed on failure of September rains and climate change, besides of course the us opposition to ratify the Kyoto Protocol. We forget, in the bargain, our self-sustained path towards environmental suicide within our own borders. We are contributing to the carbon dioxide in the air with the burning of every tree and twig. We don't need to be an industrial country to add to the environment pollution. Our energy ministers should be made accountable for environment management issues. Until then the polluted ingestion of the air will continue. Kyoto needs to certainly address this issue, even if it is from an 'exempted' country.

ABOUD
Dar es Salaam
asjumbe@yahoo.co.in
...

The 'other' thought

Let us stop for a minute and look at Kyoto without the anti-us coloured glasses. Not that they are innocent but on glancing at Dar es Salaam's ecological system, they may have a point in getting poor countries covered under the Kyoto Insurance. An exempted community member (non-industrial country) in the Kyoto Protocol, Dar es Salaam is losing innumerable acres of national forest area because of an energy crisis. Should the trend continue, by 2050, with a population then reaching a 70 million, the land would be barren. The country's environment crisis can be blamed on failure of September rains and climate change, besides of course the us opposition to ratify the Kyoto Protocol. We forget, in the bargain, our self-sustained path towards environmental suicide within our own borders. We are contributing to the carbon dioxide in the air with the burning of every tree and twig. We don't need to be an industrial country to add to the environment pollution. Our energy ministers should be made accountable for environment management issues. Until then the polluted ingestion of the air will continue. Kyoto needs to certainly address this issue, even if it is from an 'exempted' country.

ABOUD
Dar es Salaam
asjumbe@yahoo.co.in
...

The 'other' thought

Let us stop for a minute and look at Kyoto without the anti-us coloured glasses. Not that they are innocent but on glancing at Dar es Salaam's ecological system, they may have a point in getting poor countries covered under the Kyoto Insurance. An exempted community member (non-industrial country) in the Kyoto Protocol, Dar es Salaam is losing innumerable acres of national forest area because of an energy crisis. Should the trend continue, by 2050, with a population then reaching a 70 million, the land would be barren. The country's environment crisis can be blamed on failure of September rains and climate change, besides of course the us opposition to ratify the Kyoto Protocol. We forget, in the bargain, our self-sustained path towards environmental suicide within our own borders. We are contributing to the carbon dioxide in the air with the burning of every tree and twig. We don't need to be an industrial country to add to the environment pollution. Our energy ministers should be made accountable for environment management issues. Until then the polluted ingestion of the air will continue. Kyoto needs to certainly address this issue, even if it is from an 'exempted' country.

ABOUD
Dar es Salaam
asjumbe@yahoo.co.in
...

Tell the people...

The Nethravathi River Diversion Committee (nrdc) has been formed to conduct a pilot study of how 142 thousand million cubic metres (tmc) of water, out of the total 464 tmc of water from Nethravathi, can be diverted east to the Hemavati basin. This Rs 15.6 crore project will irrigate 50 lakh acres of land in seven districts of south Karnataka.

Before venturing into this project, it would be just for the nrdc to consult the primary stakeholders in Dakshin Kannada district, mainly the farmers, fisher folk, boat owners and landless agricultural labourers. nrdc should also conduct an Environment Impact Assessment and a public hearing in the district before contracts are signed or any financial dealings are done. If this plan to interlink waterways is the reason why the nrdc is formed, the public should have the right to information about the agenda involved. They should know how much the nrdc plans to spend on this venture.

S G VOMBATKERE
sgvombatkere@hotmail.com...

Tell the people...

The Nethravathi River Diversion Committee (nrdc) has been formed to conduct a pilot study of how 142 thousand million cubic metres (tmc) of water, out of the total 464 tmc of water from Nethravathi, can be diverted east to the Hemavati basin. This Rs 15.6 crore project will irrigate 50 lakh acres of land in seven districts of south Karnataka.

Before venturing into this project, it would be just for the nrdc to consult the primary stakeholders in Dakshin Kannada district, mainly the farmers, fisher folk, boat owners and landless agricultural labourers. nrdc should also conduct an Environment Impact Assessment and a public hearing in the district before contracts are signed or any financial dealings are done. If this plan to interlink waterways is the reason why the nrdc is formed, the public should have the right to information about the agenda involved. They should know how much the nrdc plans to spend on this venture.

S G VOMBATKERE
sgvombatkere@hotmail.com...

Tell the people...

The Nethravathi River Diversion Committee (nrdc) has been formed to conduct a pilot study of how 142 thousand million cubic metres (tmc) of water, out of the total 464 tmc of water from Nethravathi, can be diverted east to the Hemavati basin. This Rs 15.6 crore project will irrigate 50 lakh acres of land in seven districts of south Karnataka.

Before venturing into this project, it would be just for the nrdc to consult the primary stakeholders in Dakshin Kannada district, mainly the farmers, fisher folk, boat owners and landless agricultural labourers. nrdc should also conduct an Environment Impact Assessment and a public hearing in the district before contracts are signed or any financial dealings are done. If this plan to interlink waterways is the reason why the nrdc is formed, the public should have the right to information about the agenda involved. They should know how much the nrdc plans to spend on this venture.

S G VOMBATKERE
sgvombatkere@hotmail.com...

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I would like to get information about the anodized pressure cookers sold in the market. How safe are they? Do they cause damage to one's health? Please lend some light on this.
USHA PRIYADARSHINI
ushapriyadarshini@yahoo.com

Please tell me if groundnuts are grown organically in India? If so, where could I get more information on this?
MAYA NATH
sarasvati81@aol.com...

Help

I would like to get information about the anodized pressure cookers sold in the market. How safe are they? Do they cause damage to one's health? Please lend some light on this.
USHA PRIYADARSHINI
ushapriyadarshini@yahoo.com

Please tell me if groundnuts are grown organically in India? If so, where could I get more information on this?
MAYA NATH
sarasvati81@aol.com...

Help

I would like to get information about the anodized pressure cookers sold in the market. How safe are they? Do they cause damage to one's health? Please lend some light on this.
USHA PRIYADARSHINI
ushapriyadarshini@yahoo.com

Please tell me if groundnuts are grown organically in India? If so, where could I get more information on this?
MAYA NATH
sarasvati81@aol.com...

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