Website review: http://www.inequality.org

The global divide in income, health and wealth has only widened further in this era of unregulated capitalism. And there are no signs of it being bridged

 
Published: Sunday 31 August 2003

http://www.inequality.org

"We can either have democracy in this country or we can have great wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we can't have both." This website, maintained by a network of concerned journalists, writers and researchers headquartered in New York, starts off with a quote by Louis Brandeis. And that's exactly the point they are trying to prove. The global divide in income, health and wealth has only widened further in this era of unregulated capitalism. And there are no signs of it being bridged.

This website offers news, facts and figures, and even advice on the various aspects on inequality. An "Overclass" section keeps a "corpwatch" like eye on CEOs and big corporations. Other sections offer advice on how to cope with looming poverty and there is even a resource-guide of experts in the field. Readers can also take part in discussions on global climate change and poverty.

Poverty and inequality is very real. Not only in the poorer nations but also in the US and Europe. Most of the articles are sourced from other publications and being a US-based portal, there is more information on issues such as President Bush's tax cuts and the erosion of the public health infrastructure than on global issues. For a break, there is a rich library of quotes on the subject: "It is manifestly contrary to the law of nature, however defined, that a child should govern an old man, that an imbecile should lead a wise man, and that a handful of people should gorge themselves with superfluities while the hungry multitude goes in want of necessities." -- Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Subscribe to Weekly Newsletter :

Comments are moderated and will be published only after the site moderator’s approval. Please use a genuine email ID and provide your name. Selected comments may also be used in the ‘Letters’ section of the Down To Earth print edition.